Preventive Care


Chanda Jones

Providers-19

Chanda Jones is originally from Denver, CO. She has lived in Lake City since 2002. She graduated from the University of Florida in 1997. She enjoys teaching gymnastics and promoting a healthy lifestyle. Chanda is the mother of two and has been married since 1998. Family is everything to Chanda and friendships are keys in staying happy. God provides her opportunities everyday and she loves life!

Weight Management

 WHY WEIGHT?

People know the healthier choice; they just need FREQUENT reminders to make it. Even when you start with making small changes, this can make a BIG difference! Dr. Wright’s wish is for every person is to stay healthy through proper diet, regular exercise and good nutritional supplements and this was the start of our weight management program. The Weight Management program is for you if you want to do one or any of the following: lose weight, lower your cholesterol, soothe your stress, maintain your health during seasonal changes, increase your energy and stamina, or just maintain overall health. “Obesity can shorten people’s lives by 12 years. ” USA Today

Cholesterol Matters

CHOLESTEROL GOOD vs BAD? #3 cause of Preventable death: GOOD = Cholesterol is produced in the liver and is a waxy fat-like substance. It is a required building block of all cells in the human body. In addition to producing cell membranes, cholesterol is critical to the production of the hormones testosterone as well as vitamin D and bile acids that assist in the proper digestion of fat. ACTIVITY: Drop a small piece of wax into water. Does the water stick to the wax? This is an example of HDL (healthy) within the arterial walls, it does not stick. BAD = Unfortunately, LDL make up the majority of the body’s cholesterol. Having high levels (the level defined as high total cholesterol is 240 mg/dL and above) can lead to a buildup in the arteries and result in heart disease. ACTIVITY: Drop a small piece of wax into salt. Does the salt stick to the wax? This is an example of LDL (lousy) within the arterial walls, it sticks easily. With too much of this, your arteries become congested.

Desirable Cholesterol Levels

Total Cholesterol:

Less than 200 mg/dL

LDL (“Bad” Cholesterol)

Less than 100 mg/dL*

HDL (“Good” Cholesterol)

60 mg/dL or higher

Triglycerides

Less than 150 mg/dL

Quitting Smoking

Within 20 minutes after you smoke that last cigarette, your body begins a series of changes that continue for years.(www.cdc.gov/tobacco)
    • 20 Minutes After Quitting:
      • Your heart rate drops.
    • 12 hours After Quitting:
      • Carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.
    • 2 Weeks to 3 Months After Quitting:
      • Your heart attack risk begins to drop.
      • Your lung function begins to improve.
    • 1 to 9 Months After Quitting:
      • Your coughing and shortness of breath decrease.
    • 1 Year After Quitting:
      • Your added risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a smoker’s.
    • 5 Years After Quitting:
      • Your stroke risk is reduced to that of a nonsmoker’s

5-15 years after quitting.

    • 10 Years After Quitting:
      • Your lung cancer death rate is about half that of a smoker’s.
      • Your risk of cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, kidney, and pancreas decreases.
    • 15 Years After Quitting:
      • Your risk of coronary heart disease is back to that of a nonsmoker’s.

Want 15 extra years or a cigarette? Get your quit plan today!

Strength Training

Healthy Physical Activity Regimen

Physical Activity for Your 20’s: The great thing about being in your 20s is that your body is so strong; you can get away with abusing it. The bad thing is that you often do, punishing it with late nights and bad eating habits. And you routinely fail to appreciate what you have. This is the decade of anxiety — frantic exercise, fad diets, the mad pursuit of pinup perfection and self-hatred when you fail to meet it. The fitness challenge of these years: Get over it. Lots of cardio is great, but mix it up so you really push the body. But it is strength training that builds muscle definition, not to mention bone density, which will be crucial for staying active later on and preventing osteoporosis. 30 minutes of strength training followed by 30 minutes of endurance 3x a week, plus 45 to 60 minutes of straight endurance 3x a week. One day of rest.

Chart below offers some ideas to get you started. Always stretch before and after!

FLEXIBILITY (hold 7–10 seconds)

BALANCE

ENDURANCE (30 minutes)

STRENGTH

1) Straddle stretch reach right, left and middle 1) Standing Bent Knee leg lift and extend to straight leg (hold 7 seconds) 1) Combine runs, jumps and lunge walks 1) Push ups (3 sets of 12 reps)
2) Hamstring stretch flexed/pointed foot 2) Single leg Chair Stands 2) Squat thrusts(20x) 2) Crunches (3 sets of 25 reps)

Physical Activity for Your 30’s: With the 30s, you start noticing that weight doesn’t come off quite as easily as it used to. This is because after age 20, your basal metabolism drops by 1 to 2 percent every decade, and as lean muscle decreases and body fat increases, you don’t need as many calories to sustain yourself. One hour of circuit training (endurance and strength), 4x a week, plus at least one day of endurance for 45 to 60 minutes at a high intensity. Take one day off.

Chart below offers some ideas to get you started. Always stretch before and after!

FLEXIBILITY (hold 7–10 seconds)

BALANCE

ENDURANCE (30 minutes)

STRENGTH

1) Straddle stretch reach right, left and middle 1) Standing Bent Knee leg lift and extend to straight leg (hold 7 seconds) 1) Combine runs, jumps and lunge walks 1) Push ups (3 sets of 15 reps)
2) Hamstring stretch flexed/pointed foot 2) Single leg Chair Stands 2) Burpees (20x) 2) Crunches (3 sets of 30 reps)

Physical Activity for Your 40’s: This is the decade of the triple whammy: gravity, hormones, and slowing of metabolism as lean muscle mass continues to decrease and body fat increases. Even women who don’t put on a pound may expand, according to Pamela Peeke, M.D., author of “Body for Life for Women.” After 40 and certainly after 50, you may find that you gain fat more easily in the torso, below the bra, through the triceps area, on the back, and in the belly. The reason for this is because your body composition is changing. One hour of strength training 3 days a week (if you do your whole body at once), 4 days for half an hour, if you split it up, plus 45 minutes of endurance 5 days a week. Take one day off.

Chart below offers some ideas to get you started. Always stretch before and after!

FLEXIBILITY (hold 7–10 seconds)

BALANCE

ENDURANCE (30 minutes)

STRENGTH

1) Straddle stretch reach right, left and middle 1) Standing straight leg lift (hold 7 secs) swing leg back to scale (hold 7secs)10x each leg 1) Combine runs, jumps and lunge walks 1) Push ups girl or boy style(3 sets of 12 reps)
2) “Seal” stretch to work on stomach and low back 2) Single leg lift (hold 10 secs) 10x each leg 2) Squat thrusts (20x) 2) Crunches (3 sets of 20 reps)

Physical Activity for Your 50’s: If your metabolism feels like it’s slowing to a crawl, it’s not in your mind. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh studying 541 midlife women found an average gain of 12 pounds eight years after menopause. We also tend to gain a little potbelly. And other places begin to droop noticeably. “At this point, loss of muscle mass and tone really shows,” says longtime fitness expert Kathy Smith, 54. “It can actually start to change your posture.” Rx: 4 to 6 endurance sessions a week, 20 to 40 minutes each, with an intensity that lets you answer a simple question but not chat, plus half an hour of strength training twice a week, 8 to 12 repetitions of each exercise if using weights, or 15 to 20 without weights.

Chart below offers some ideas to get you started. Always stretch before and after!

FLEXIBILITY (hold 7–10 seconds)

BALANCE

ENDURANCE (20 minutes)

STRENGTH

1) Toe Touch standing or sitting 1) Standing straight leg lift (hold 7-10 secs)10x each leg 1) Combine slow jogging with some lunge walks 1) “Cat” style Push ups make sure elbow goes straight back (3 sets of 12 reps)
2) “Seal” stretch to work on stomach and low back 2) Single leg stand (hold 20 secs) 10x each leg 2) Fast high knees(20x each leg) 2) Rows (arm prop assist is okay (3 sets of 20 reps)

Physical Activity for Your 60’s: In the 60s, problems like arthritis, bad knees, and spinal stenosis (a narrowing of the spaces between bones that can put painful pressure on the spinal cord) become common. Aches and pains are not an excuse for giving up exercise. Make changes so that exercise doesn’t jar and stress the joints — for example, replace long runs with jogging. Maybe, jogging in a pool, swimming, or riding a stationary bicycle is a good exchange. (Women with bad backs may need to use a recumbent bicycle.) Walking three to five miles a day offers both cardio and bone-strengthening benefits. Stretching and balance are absolute musts. If you don’t stretch now, “by the time you’re in your 80s, your joints will have lost their flexibility. If you haven’t been physically active, start slowly: • Do strength exercises 1 – 3 times, and build up slowly • Do endurance exercise (brisk walking, for example) for 5 – 10 minutes each day and slowly build up to 30 minutes • If you are out of breath and it is hard to talk, slow down or do less • Stretch slowly and you will become more flexible after a while 3 days a week of challenging but not exhausting endurance, such as a brisk walk, plus 3 days of strength training, use light resistance and slower, more controlled movements combined with slow, sustained stretching. Walk whenever possible, and do daily balance exercises.

Chart below offers some ideas to get you started. Always stretch before and after!

FLEXIBILITY (hold 7–10 seconds)

BALANCE (Standing)

ENDURANCE

STRENGTH

1) Seated straight leg extend with reach 1) Knee Lifts 1) Walk across the yard or parking lot 1) Wall Push up
2) Raise straight arms overhead 2) Chair Stands 2) March in place 2) Chair stands

Physical Activity for your 70’s and 80’s: Is Physical Activity Safe for Me? Yes! Physical activity is good, and not harmful, for most. Not being physically active is much less safe. Those of you who have arthritis, diabetes or osteoporosis (bone loss) can safely do physical activity to improve your health and fitness. Physical activity will make your joints work better and can reduce the pain of arthritis. Physical activity has the potential to change the way we age. It provides physical, mental and social benefits and helps keep you mobile and independent. Much loss of function that was thought to be “normal” aging is actually the result of not being physically active. Despite these important benefits, older adults are too inactive. By age 75, one in two women and one in three men get no physical activity at all. Given that 88% of older adults over 65 have at least one chronic condition, physical inactivity is a public-health issue, not just a personal problem. Why don’t you get more exercise? Multiple barriers confront you as you age, including the physical environment (lack of transportation), the social environment (family members who disapprove), the intrapersonal environment within ourselves (fear of looking foolish). Brainstorming solutions can be a creative and motivating process. (American Society on Aging Live Well, Live Long: Steps to Better Health Series, 2005.)

Chart below offers some ideas to get you started. Always stretch before and after!

FLEXIBILITY TRAINING

BALANCE TRAINING

ENDURANCE TRAINING

STRENGTH TRAINING

Increases the mobility around the joints to help move without pain Helps with bone strength and preventing falls Raising the heart rate to promote heart health Increases the muscles to aid in everyday activity
(hold 7–10 seconds) 1) Seated straight leg extend with reach 2) Raise straight arms overhead (standing) 1) Knee Lifts 2) Chair Stands 1) Walk across the yard or parking lot 2) March in place 1) Wall Push up 2) Chair stands

Lifes Stages

(20’s) The great thing about being in your 20s is that your body is so strong; you can get away with abusing it. The bad thing is that you often do, punishing it with late nights and bad eating habits. And you routinely fail to appreciate what you have. This is the decade of anxiety — crazy exercise, fad diets, the pursuit of perfection and self-hatred when you fail to meet it. This is the time to forget about the extreme and go for healthy. Now is the time your body needs a good behavior pattern, so as to lay the foundation for healthy aging.
(30’s) “Exercise is the number one form of preventive medicine,” says Jillian Michaels, 32, who was a trainer on the first three seasons of NBC’s “The Biggest Loser” and is the author of “Winning by Losing: Drop the Weight, Change Your Life.””You won’t see that big a difference between 31 and 39 if you’ve been living a healthy lifestyle, but if not; you’ll see a huge difference in muscle tone, weight, and shape.” In this decade, experts agree, keeping fit means working harder. Preferred is circuit training — a series of resistance and cardio exercises done swiftly and back-to-back. But however you do it, Michaels advises strength training each muscle group twice a week with two days of rest between sessions. Don’t stick with heavy weights/low reps or low weight/many reps, she says; switch it around to keep your body from getting used to the routine. One day of rest a week is crucial. After pregnancy a program like Pilates can be invaluable in “pulling everything back in and up,” says Brooke Siler, 38, whose re:AB studio in New York City has attracted famous figures like Amber Valletta, Madonna, and Liv Tyler. “I especially like exercises that involve standing, because they teach you to fight what nature wants you to do, which is slump,” says Siler, the author of “The Pilates Body.” Now is the time to make good fitness habits a part of everyday life. Stay constantly aware of how you sit and stand and walk down the street. Keep pulling in and up. These invisible workouts are really important for a woman in her 30s. It’s how you prepare your body for what’s to come.
(40’s) In your 40s, you know your body and probably have a greater sense of what it means to take good care of yourself. Trust that knowledge and stay on top of the three basics of wellness – practicing healthy lifestyle habits, eating a balanced diet, and exercising regularly. Now is the time when it is easier to become more relaxed in your everyday behaviors, so try to stay focused and challenge yourself to stay ahead of things. If possible look to a new physical goal, like running a 5K, or making your exercise routine everyday for the next month, or limiting your sweet intake to half of what it is now. No matter how big or small the goal may be as long as you are striving for that goal you will be more motivated to handle the changes your body will be going through in the next ten years. Your body now will need more supplemental vitamins because your body is lacking the ability it once had to provide its own nutrients.
(50’s) If you haven’t started strength training, you must. If you are a beginner, it is important you do the exercises with correct posture and technique and I suggest guidance from someone who is qualified. You want to hit all the major muscle groups, and you can do a strength training routine within a short amount of time just around the house or even in the workplace! While the physical changes that this decade brings may be hard to take at first, you must take it in stride and accept what is going on. You change what you can, and live with what you can’t. It’s a gentler way.
(60’s) “We now know that a decline in strength and fitness isn’t entirely a natural consequence of the aging process but is also due to lack of use. We need to push ourselves physically no matter how old we are we just may need to alter the activity.” says Marilyn Moffat, Ph.D.,a professor of physical therapy at New York University and co-author of “Age-Defying Fitness.”
(70’s) Women in their 70s have doubled their strength in nine weeks. (ELDER) The strength and endurance of muscles is especially critical for older adults, who tend to lose muscle mass and therefore strength as they age. Muscle strength decreases approximately 15 percent each decade after 60, and 30 percent each decade after 80. This loss of strength is chiefly attributed to muscle atrophy (the decrease in the size of a muscle due to disuse), and a decrease in certain muscle fibers. Muscles lose their strength at a slower rate when strength training is performed. Older adults need strong muscles to walk, climb stairs, get up from a sitting position, lift packages, reach up and down, open doors, and play with grandchildren. Strength training can help prevent falls and fractures. Strength training also promotes bone density, which prevents osteoporosis (bone loss).